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Financial Check List for the End of the Year

Sep 1, 2021 | Financial Concepts, Slice of Life

There is a small, but distinct, satisfaction that comes from crossing items off of a list. The immediate sense of accomplishment gives us a boost that propels us to the next thing on the list. Whether it is a chore list on the weekend or items off a grocery list, we, as a whole, increase our productivity when we have a set of priorities. 

Our financial lives would benefit from a task list just the same. As we move through 2021 with Covid still in the news and the stock market enjoying another great year, we should keep in mind that there are still things to accomplish pertaining to our finances. Think of this as a mid-year financial checklist: 

1: Fund your IRA, HSA accounts

If you have personal retirement accounts, such as Roth or Traditional IRAs, be aware of how much you have contributed to this point and how much you plan to fund before April 15, 2022. The maximum contribution amount for Roth or Traditional IRAs for 2021 is $6,000, or $7,000 if you are over the age of 50. Monthly systematic contributions plans are a great way to fund these accounts; however, many of these plans were set up years ago when the contribution limits were lower. You may not be max funding your account if you haven’t increased your monthly amount within the last few years. Health Savings Accounts are another great way to save money in a tax-preferred way. Not everyone is eligible for an HSA, so check to make sure you qualify. The 2021 contribution limit for individual HSA accounts is $3,600 and $7,200 for family accounts. 

2: Complete your RMDs from IRA, Beneficiary RMD

Required minimum distributions, or RMDs, are annual distributions from IRA accounts. In 2020, required minimum distributions were suspended and have been reinstated for 2021. Recent legislation has increased the age for RMDs to 72 for tax-deferred IRA; however, inherited IRA accounts have different distribution restrictions, so be aware if you are the owner of an inherited IRA as you may need to take distributions prior to age 72. RMD’s must be taken by December 31 of each year, except in the year that you turn 72, in which you have until April 1 of the following year. It is the responsibility of the IRA owner to ensure that the total RMD amount due is withdrawn each year and that the calculation takes into consideration all of their tax-deferred IRA assets.  

3: Verify your 401k, 403b Contributions

The maximum amount that employees can contribute to their 401k or 403b accounts for 2021 is $19,500, with an additional $6,500 allowed if the employee is over the age of 50. This maximum contribution amount has been increasing over the last few years so it is important to verify the amount coming out of each paycheck if your desire is to max fund your account. These limits do not take into consideration any match provided by your employer. Most employers offer flexibility in making and changing contribution amounts, so you could increase your amount mid-year if you are not on track. Also, be aware that many of the 401k or 403b plans now offer a Roth option within their plan. This doesn’t affect any Roth IRA contributions. 

4: Check Your Mortgage Rate For Possible Refinance Opportunities

I fully realize that the mortgage refinance discussion is becoming quite repetitive at this point, but it does bear repeating. The current mortgage rates are under 3% for a 30-year fixed mortgage, and the 15-year mortgage rate is in the low 2% range at many lending institutions. We generally advise looking into a mortgage refinance if you are planning on staying in the home for at least 3-5 more years and a rate reduction of at least .5%-.75%. That said, everyone has a different financial situation and should consult with a financial advisor or mortgage specialist prior to making a final decision. For many people who have refinanced within the last few years, another refinance may not be appealing; however, it would behoove you to look into this option again if the variables are in your favor. 

5: Review Your Cash Position, Travel Expenditures

Take time to review your current cash position and the amount of cash you prefer to have at any given time. A person or family’s cash position is an interesting subject within the world of financial advising. We have clients who need six-figure cash positions to feel comfortable, while other clients desire to hold small cash positions as they don’t like “money on the sidelines.” We like to frame this conversation by taking into consideration any other investment and retirement accounts. For example, a client with a large taxable account can afford to get away with a smaller cash position in contrast to a client with all of their non-cash assets in IRA or 401k accounts, where liquidity provisions are more onerous. We strongly believe that every well-built financial plan has a healthy cash position to cover job losses, emergency expenses or unexpected travel. The current low-rate environment is creating a challenge to find a decent return for cash; however, safety is the main job for this portion of your financial plan. 

This is not a comprehensive list, by any means, but I hope this makes you think about a few things to review between now and the end of the year. We are more than happy to discuss any of these items with you and how they pertain to your overall financial plan.

Nate Condon