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What are the Limits for My Investing and Spending Accounts?

What are the Limits for My Investing and Spending Accounts?

As Spring springs and we approach the end of the first quarter of 2022, it is a good time to familiarize yourself with the changes to the more popular savings vehicles. It is imperative to understand the basics of these accounts to avoid mistakes, as the penalties can be quite onerous. This is not an exhaustive list, but it is a good place to start. 

The list is broken up into the appropriate categories of employer-sponsored plans, personal retirement plans, healthcare and spending accounts, and educational accounts.   

Employer-Sponsored Plans

401(k), 403(b), and most 457 plans have a new maximum employee contribution limit of $20,500, up from $19,500 in 2021. The overall maximum annual additions into defined contribution plans (which include 401(k) and 403(b) plans) increased from $58,000 to $61,000. 

Individuals aged 50 and older are allowed an additional $6,500 of contributions. Note that the “age 50 catch-up” amount did not increase from 2021 to 2022.

Personal Retirement Plans

IRA and Roth IRA contribution limits are unchanged at $6,000 for people under the age of 50 and $7,000 for individuals 50 years old and older. 

The traditional and Roth IRA income phase-out ranges are also increasing. 

Healthcare and Spending Accounts

Health Savings Account contribution limits increased from $3,600 to $3,650 for individuals and $7,200 to $7,300 for families. 

The HSA catch-up contribution for individuals 55 years old and older is an additional $1,000. This is unchanged from 2021.

The  Health Care Flexible Spending Account (FSA) limit has increased to $2,850 in 2022 – up from $2,750 in 2021.

The Dependent Care FSA limit in 2022 has reverted back to $5,000 for a married couple filing a joint tax return. The American Rescue Plan temporarily increased the limit to $10,500 in 2021.

529 College Savings Plan

529 plans do not have contribution maximums; however, contributions are considered completed gifts for federal tax purposes, and in 2022 up to $16,000 per donor ($15,000 in 2021), per beneficiary qualifies for the annual gift tax exclusion.

The Coverdell IRA contribution limit is $2,000 per student, per calendar year. 

The annual changes to contributions and income limits are not consistent year-over-year; therefore, understanding the changes and how they affect your specific situation is important. It is a good idea to check your contribution levels early in the year as payroll adjustments and/or automatic contributions into your IRA accounts may be required periodically. 

Nate Condon